16
Dec

Brush Your Teeth Better in 2020

Best Cosmetic Dentist Austin

Most people, it’s safe to assume, brush their teeth once, maybe twice a day. After breakfast, perhaps. Again before bed. Maybe in between. For years, this has been considered fine: brush your teeth a few times a day and enjoy peak oral health for a lifetime. 

The truth is, brushing your teeth isn’t complex, but it’s not as simple as you may have been led to believe. Even the most thorough among us may be able to optimize their brushing routine (and in so doing their oral health) by giving a little bit more attention to this first line of defense against tooth decay, root canal infections and gum disease. 

How to (Really) Brush Your Teeth

First things first, you need a good toothbrush to effectively clean your teeth. We strongly recommend the Diamond Clean Sonicare

Sonicare smart brushes deliver up to 62,000 brush movements per minute, giving you the equivalent results of a whole month’s worth of manual brushing in just two minutes! To us this is the most effective and yet gentle clean you can get. 

Besides a good toothbrush, it is also important that your toothpaste contain fluoride – a mineral essential for keeping enamel strong. The Center for Disease Control, the World Health Organization, the American Public Health Organization, the American Dental Association, and the American Academy of Pediatrics encourage its use in both toothpaste and water.

With your fluoride toothpaste and electric toothbrush, you’re ready to get started. Here’s what you do:

  • Starting with the outer surface of the teeth, brush side-to-side, making sure to hit all areas. If your toothbrush is manual, hold it at a 45-degree angle. Moving from outer surfaces to biting surfaces and finally to the back of the teeth.
  • Brush after every meal and snack for at least two minutes. If you have eaten something acidic or sweet, wait for 30 minutes before brushing to allow enamel to recover. Drinking water during this time can help flush bacteria and acid from the surface of teeth.
  • Floss before you brush every morning and night. It used to be assumed that flossing was equally effective both before and after brushing, but new evidence suggests the optimal sequence is flossing first and brushing after. And if you’re finishing off with a mouthwash, wait for half an hour after flossing and brushing. This allows the fluoride from your toothpaste to do its job before being rinsed away.

Professional Care

Even if you have the most impressive at home routine, it cannot help but benefit from professional care. Many oral health issues can occur quickly – even in healthy individuals – making biannual visits an important part of your overall healthcare routine.

Remember, issues like gum disease can increase risks for serious health problems including heart attack, kidney failure, pancreatic cancer, and dementia. The better care you take of your teeth, the lower your risk of these potentially deadly conditions.

To schedule your next appointment at Dr. Bell’s office, please call 512-327-7750 today. During this visit, we can discuss ways for you to optimize your daily routine and answer any questions you have about the best and most effective ways to brush your teeth.

 

Happy Brushing in 2020!

 

27
Nov

Oral Piercings Can Really Damage Your Teeth

You might think having your tongue pierced looks cool now, but did you know that oral piercings can damage your teeth?

Oral piercings can, in the long run, make your teeth move. Your teeth shouldn’t move, and once they do, you will end up with a gap in your smile. You don’t want that! Here are a few other ways oral piercings can damage your teeth.

Can Cause Your Teeth to Crack and Chip

Not only, when your teeth move from having an oral piercing, can create a gap, but once the piercing causes the chips and cracks in your teeth, this will cause an even bigger hole. Having a gap in your teeth can make you look bad. The chips and cracks can be due to bumping the teeth against the piercing. You can easily hit the two together while eating or even talking to someone.

Can Cause Bacterial Infections

If you don’t maintain the piercing good enough, especially within the first couple of weeks after having it done, you can end up with a bacterial infection in your mouth. Some of these infections include blood-borne hepatitis, angina, and herpes. Since no one wants this to happen, read further to find out how to avoid these problems.

Ways to Avoid Problems After You Have Gotten an Oral Piercing

If you have already gotten your tongue pierced, don’t worry because there are ways to avoid these problems associated with oral piercings. The main thing to remember is to care for your tongue piercing all the time, especially within the first few weeks of getting it done. If you don’t keep it clean and maintained like you are supposed to, you will end up with an infection in your mouth.

When you first get your piercing on your tongue, gauge it accordingly by getting an extended piece of jewelry instead of something small. If you choose something small, like a stud, at first, this can cause it to swell over the piercing. After you have had it for a while, and after the initial swelling goes down, you can then get your stud put in.

Contact us for ways to maintain your oral piercing or for information on why you should not get one in the first place.

21
Oct

Places to Easily Cut Sugar Out of Your Diet

Sugar is not good for teeth or for your overall health. This is why it is important to cut the sugar from your diet and make sure to keep it off of your teeth. You want to have healthier teeth and gums overall, but where are you going to cut the sugar out? What if you already feel that you’re eating somewhat healthy?

Here are some tips for not only cutting out the sugar, but making sure that you keep the sugar off of your teeth.

Tips for Reducing Sugar Intake

While you might feel like you don’t intake a lot of sugar on a daily basis, you can still reduce the amount that sits on your teeth. Here are some great tips for helping your oral health and getting more out of the things you eat and the integrity of your teeth.

  • Reduce the amount of candy or baked goods that you eat on a daily basis.
  • Rinse out your mouth after eating anything that is acidic or high in sugar content.
  • Brush after each meal to reduce any type of sugar or other food that might be sitting on the outside of the teeth.
  • Stay away from acidic drinks and food, since these can be just as bad as the sugary ones that you eat.
  • Do not drink soda, as this can damage the teeth and your overall health because it is a sweet, sugary drink with a high sugar content.
  • Drink milk, tea and coffee through a straw to reduce the effects that they have on the teeth.

There are many ways you can eat healthier, reduce sugar and still maintain healthier teeth. Keeping up on your oral hygiene and cleanings at the dentist are great ways to do so. Speak with us today to schedule an appointment.

3
Sep

How Do Your Brushing Habits Compare?

Woman brushing her teeth good brushing habits

WE’RE SUPPOSED TO BRUSH twice a day for two minutes each time. How many of us actually do that? See how you measure up!

From a recent poll:

  • 49% of men brush their teeth only once a day.
  • 57% of women brush their teeth only once a day.

And, the average person only brushes his or her teeth for 30 seconds each time—not nearly long enough! That’s only one-fourth of the time really needed!

Brush Softer, And Take The Full 2 Minutes

Many choose to brush more vigorously to save time. Although it’s quicker, brushing aggressively can wear down tooth enamel. If you brush harder than needed, remember to brush gently but thoroughly for the full two minutes.

Think About Your Brushing Technique

For the deepest clean possible, brush at a 45-degree angle in small circular motions around all tooth surfaces. One of the biggest places for build-up is around the gum line. If neglected, gums can become swollen and infected because of plaque left behind.

Clean Your Tongue!

The tongue is the biggest bacteria host in the mouth! If you only brush your teeth, the bacteria left on your tongue transfers to your teeth, making them dirty again. Remember to clean every area of the tongue. If you experience a gag reflex when using a toothbrush, consider trying a tongue scraper. A clean tongue helps keep your teeth clean, and it helps keep your breath fresh!

We Love Your Smile

We’re focused on helping your smile look and feel its best! We’re committed to your overall health as well. Remember, brushing twice a day for two minutes each time is a necessity, not a recommendation.

Thanks for reading our blog, and happy brushing!

Top image by Flickr user Taz used under Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.