Mark Woodruff, Author at Michael C. Bell DDS, PC - Page 2 of 2
24
Sep

Running and Oral Health

ARE YOU A RUNNER? Or, do you know a runner? Here’s an important question to ask… “Does your training include specific consideration for your oral health?” Do those two things sound unrelated? There’re not. Read on!

With Each Extra Training Hour, Decay Risk Goes Up

The rest of your body may be in tip-top shape. But a recent study published in the Scandinavian Journal Of Medicine & Science In Sports found two very specific oral health problem areas for athletes.

1. Dry Mouth Effects

Think about the way your mouth feels when you’re racing or on a training run. You’re likely breathing heavily through your mouth. Your mouth becomes dry as a desert. In addition, because there’s higher susceptibility to dehydration (at some level) you don’t recover from dry mouth as quickly as you would otherwise. Dry mouth creates a danger zone for your teeth.

2. Sport-Related Nutrition Effects

When you’re racing or on training runs, what are you putting into your body, and how are those things affecting your teeth? If you’re like most runners, you’re often consuming:

  • acidic sports drinks, some of which have lots of sugar
  • energy gels or gummies that stick to your dry teeth
  • energy bars that are often loaded with sugar and starch

These kinds of substances inside a dry mouth, coupled with the likelihood that they will sit on your teeth for long periods of time, creates an unfriendly environment for your healthy smile.

This DOES NOT Mean You Should Stop Running!

Of course not! Just be aware! And, here are some helpful suggestions…

Be Cautious About What You’re Eating & Drinking

  • Drink lots of water! Water, not energy drinks are best.
  • If you DO consume energy drinks, rotate them with water. Rinse, rinse, rinse.
  • Drink water BEFORE you get dehydrated, not after.
  • Brush before and after workouts.
  • If you’re consuming gels or other sticky substances, mix in some carrot or celery sticks (scrubber foods).

And, Avoid Embarrassment Too (haha)

Don’t be that awkward runner…

What Are YOU Training For?

Are you an avid runner? Or maybe you’re just jogging a little bit. Talk to us if you’re starting any kind of new workout plan. As you know, we like to keep up with any health-related changes in your life. It helps us keep your mouth healthy. Let us know!

Thanks for being our valued patient and friend.

17
Sep

The Connection Between Gum Disease And Rheumatoid Arthritis

A GROWING BODY OF RESEARCH linking periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis suggests that taking care of our teeth may also be a really good way to take care of our joints. Researchers found that porphyromonas gingivalis, the same bacteria primarily responsible for gum disease, can also be found in the knee joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Oral Health Problems Don’t Remain Isolated In Our Mouths

There are significant links between our oral health and our whole body health. The connection between gum disease and RA isn’t the only evidence studies have found of oral bacteria migrating to other parts of the body. Gum health has also been linked by some researchers to many other systemic conditions including diabetes, heart health, Alzheimer’s, and more.

The Common Thread

RA is an inflammatory immune disorder. Porphyromonas gingivalis bacteria in your mouth may release an enzyme which makes the residue of certain proteins in your body appear to be foreign intruders. If you have RA, this can cause your immune system to attack your own body.

What Can You Do?

When monitoring the health of our bodies, a great place to start is with our mouths. The simplest of things can help prevent harmful bacteria from colonizing and spreading throughout the body.

  • Brush once or twice each day.
  • Floss daily.
  • Schedule regular cleanings and exams (remembering that you may need more frequent appointments if you have signs of gum disease).

Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Make Dental Hygiene More Difficult

Do you have RA? Or, does someone you care for (an aging parent, for example) have RA? Don’t forget that it may be harder for people who suffer from RA to do simple things like properly and thoroughly brush teeth. And, flossing can be even harder because of limited hand flexibility.

If you’re in a position where you need to assist someone with RA (or yourself), please let us know! We can help you brainstorm alternate methods for oral health care that will help.

Thanks for your trust in our practice!